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Argumentation
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Argumentation
The Art of Civil Advocacy

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August 2017 | 200 pages | SAGE Publications, Inc

Argumentation: The Art of Civil Advocacy teaches students the principles of argumentation as a practical way to engage in interpersonal and public deliberation. Authors Larry Underberg and Heather Norton offer a unique approach for creating civil discourse by encouraging students to consider how they argue with others to enhance or diminish opportunities for future dialogue. A variety of everyday examples are provided in the text to demonstrate how well-reasoned argumentation can strengthen communities and create productive citizenship. Students gain a better understanding for the situations, environments, and relationships that form the context for an advocate, and how those factors can influence discourse.

 Instructors, sign in at study.sagepub.com/Underberg for test banks, PowerPoint® slides, and more! 


 
LIST OF TABLES
 
PREFACE
 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
 
SECTION I: THE NATURE AND CONTEXT OF ARGUMENT
 
CHAPTER 1 The Process of Argument
ARGUING IS PART OF OUR NATURE  
WHAT IS ARGUMENT?  
WHY SHOULD WE ARGUE?  
ARGUING PRODUCTIVELY  
WHEN NOT TO ARGUE  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 2 Credibility: The Foundation of Responsible Advocacy
TYPES OF CREDIBILITY  
FACTORS AFFECTING AN ADVOCATE’S CREDIBILITY  
THE ADVOCATE/LISTENER RELATIONSHIP  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 3 External Factors Influencing Argument
THE AUDIENCE  
FIELD AND OCCASION  
THE LARGER CONVERSATION  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 4 Audience-Based Argument
INTERACTING WITH FAMILIAR AUDIENCES  
UNDERSTANDING UNFAMILIAR AUDIENCES  
LIMITS OF DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
SECTION II: IDENTIFYING AND MAKING QUALITY ARGUMENTS
 
CHAPTER 5 Discovering Arguments: Narrative Approaches
ARGUMENTS AS NARRATIVE  
NARRATIVE ELEMENTS  
EVALUATING NARRATIVES  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 6 Discovering Arguments: Stock Issue Approaches
QUESTIONS OF FACT  
QUESTIONS OF VALUE  
QUESTIONS OF POLICY  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 7 Supporting Arguments
WHEN DO I NEED TO USE OUTSIDE SUPPORT?  
WHY DO I NEED TO USE OUTSIDE SUPPORT?  
GENERAL EVALUATION OF OUTSIDE SUPPORT  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 8 Types and Tests of Evidence
EXAMPLES  
STATISTICS  
TESTIMONY  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
SECTION III: EFFECTIVELY PRESENTING ARGUMENTS
 
CHAPTER 9 Language and Style in Argument
THE VARIETY OF PERSONAL STYLES  
STYLE SHOULD REFLECT A CONSTRUCTIVE VIEW OF ARGUMENT  
STYLE AND CREDIBILITY  
LANGUAGE AS A COMPONENT OF STYLE  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
CHAPTER 10 Responding to Arguments
LISTENING EFFECTIVELY  
LISTENING FOR RELATIONSHIP AND CONTENT  
PREPARING TO RESPOND  
MAKING A RESPONSE  
CONCLUSION  
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION  
KEY TERMS  
 
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
APPENDIX A: THE TOULMIN MODEL  
APPENDIX B: LOGICAL FALLACIES  
 
GLOSSARY
 
NOTES
 
INDEX
 
ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Supplements

Instructor Teaching site

Password-protected Instructor Resources include the following:

    • A Microsoft® Word test bank, is available containing multiple choice, true/false, short answer, and essay questions for each chapter. The test bank provides you with a diverse range of pre-written options as well as the opportunity for editing any question and/or inserting your own personalized questions to effectively assess students’ progress and understanding.
    • Editable, chapter-specific Microsoft® PowerPoint® slides offer you complete flexibility in easily creating a multimedia presentation for your course. Each slide highlights essential content and features.
    • EXCLUSIVE! Access to certain full-text SAGE journal articles that have been carefully selected for each chapter. Each article supports and expands on the concepts presented in the chapter. This feature also provides questions to focus and guide student interpretation. Combine cutting-edge academic journal scholarship with the topics in your course for a robust classroom experience.
Key features
  • A variety of everyday situations found in public, informal, interpersonal, and community exchanges are described in a practical way that makes it easier for students to effectively work through conflict in everyday life.
  •  Contemporary and historic examples bring concepts to life and encourage readers to further their knowledge by directing them to additional resources on the internet.
  •  Summary textboxes provide a convenient outline for readers and useful presentation aids for those teaching from this book.
  •  Questions for consideration at the end of each chapter empower readers to clarify, critique, or extend material covered in each chapter through further investigation and discussion.
  •   Easy to read supplements on the Toulmin Model and Logical Fallacies (Appendix A and B) provide convenient guides to the construction of arguments and the identification of reasoning flaws.

Sample Materials & Chapters

Chapter 1: The Process of Argument


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