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Key Concepts in Critical Social Theory
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Key Concepts in Critical Social Theory

First Edition


January 2005 | 352 pages | SAGE Publications Ltd
'Clear and accessible – Key Concepts in Critical Social Theory makes difficult ideas available to an undergraduate audience' -Larry Ray, Professor of Sociology, University of Kent

The SAGE Key Concepts series provides students with accessible and authoritative knowledge of the essential topics in a variety of disciplines. Cross-referenced throughout, the format encourages critical evaluation through understanding.

Written by experienced and respected academics, the books are indispensable study aids and guides to comprehension.

Key Concepts in Critical Social Theory:

• Provides brief accounts of the central ideas behind the key concepts of critical social theory

• Prepares students to tackle primary texts and/or gives them a point of reference when they find themselves stuck

• Discusses each concept in an introductory way

• Offers further reading guidance for independent learning

• Is essential reading for undergraduates in sociology and across the social sciences.


 
Alienation
 
Alienation
 
Anomie
 
Body-Subject
 
Body-Power/Bio-Power
 
Capital (in the work of Pierre Bourdieu)
 
Citizenship
 
Colonization of the Lifeworld
 
Crisis
 
Cycles of Contention
 
Deconstruction
 
Discourse
 
Discourse Ethics
 
Doxa
 
Epistemological Break
 
Field
 
Freedom
 
Globalization
 
Habitus
 
Hegemony
 
Hexis/Body Techniques
 
Humanism and Anti-Humanism
 
Hybridity
 
I and Me
 
Id, Ego and Superego
 
Ideal Speech Situation
 
Identity (personal, social, collective and 'the politics of')
 
Ideology
 
Illusio
 
Imaginary, Symbolic and Real
 
Intersubjectivity
 
Knowledge Constitutive Interests
 
Lifeworld
 
Mirror Stage and the Ego
 
New Social Movements
 
Orientalism
 
Patriarchy
 
Performativity
 
Power
 
Power/Knowledge
 
Public Sphere
 
Racism(s) and Ethnicity
 
Rationality
 
Realism
 
Recognition (desire and struggle for)
 
Relationalsim (versus Substantialism)
 
Repertoires of Contention
 
Repression (Psychoanalysis)
 
Sex/Gender Distinction
 
Social Capital
 
Social Class
 
Social Constructions/Constructionism
 
Social Movements
 
Social Space I (Bourdieu)
 
Social Space II (Networks)
 
Symbolic Power/Symbolic Violence
 
System and Lifeworld
 
Unconscious (The)

"Each entry is written with keen insight and clarity, often locating concepts in relation to one another and to their origins in classical philosophy. The bottom line: Crossley's book offers valuable discussions that make it extremely useful for anyone interested in social theory. . . . Highly recommended."

P. Kivisto
Augustana College
CHOICE

"Nick Crossley's Key Concepts in Critical Social Theory is a useful reference tool for undergraduates of all majors trying to navigate the complexities of sociological theory. Key Concepts may also be useful for graduate students reviewing sociology basics for early graduate courses and later when preparing for comprehensive exams in sociological theory."

Emily Kearns
Emerson College

An accessible and easy to digest text for undergraduate students which provides a one-stop-shop for key concepts in sociology and social policy.

Dr John Hayton
Sport Development, Liverpool John Moores University
April 27, 2014

Absolutely brilliant. Will advise for purchase ASAP

Dr James Howley
Expressive arts and media, North East Worcestershire College
January 18, 2012

One of those texts which students rely on for a quick overview of key theories

Dr Caroline Lohmann-Hancock
ESSI, Trinity College Carmarthen
January 21, 2010

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This title is also available on SAGE Knowledge, the ultimate social sciences online library. If your library doesn’t have access, ask your librarian to start a trial.