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US Privacy Statement

This US Privacy Statement is a supplement to the information contained in our Privacy Policy and applies to residents of the United States from whom we collect personal information (“consumers”). Certain states give their residents varying rights related to their Personal Information and specifically the following states have privacy laws that apply to Sage as noted below:


Major Collection Documenting the US Civil Rights movement annouced

Adam Matthew signs new agreement with the Amistad Research Center, New Orleans

(Marlborough, UK) Adam Matthew has today announced an agreement to digitally publish a wealth of documents from the ‘Race Relations Department of the United Church Board for Homeland Ministries, 1943-1970’ held by the Amistad Research Center.



Are the Democratic and Republican parties really necessary? Find out in: Guide to U.S. Political Parties

Washington, DC - Throughout most of history, societies have been governed by powerful rulers, and the “common people” have seldom had any voice in their own governance. America’s democratic style of government is different. We vote for representatives (presidents, governors, congress members, and others) who make the laws, and most of those representatives belong to either the Democratic or Republican party. How did the party system develop? Is it good or bad? Will the system survive, given the current government gridlock? The new Guide to U.S.






Researchers advocate for optimum level of "unequality" for the U.S. Economy

Los Angeles, CA - The growing disparity in economic inequality has become so stark that even Janet Yellen, Federal Reserve chairwoman, recently expressed concern. Interestingly, new research has discovered that American citizens desire an unequal, but more equal distribution of wealth and income. Lower levels of this “unequality” are associated with decreased unethical behavior and increased motivation and labor productivity. This study is published today in the inaugural issue of Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences (PIBBS).



How has Congress shaped America? Find out in: Landmark Legislation, 1774–2012: Major U.S. Acts and Treaties

Washington, DC - More than 12,000 people have served in America’s Congress since the First Continental Congress in 1774, and, since then, almost 46,000 public acts have been signed into law. Many of those laws have played a key role in shaping America’s political and historical character. Now, CQ Press has published Landmark Legislation, 1774–2012: Major U.S. Acts and Treaties, jammed-packed with information about the most important laws and treaties enacted by the U.S. Congress—including an additional decade of new legislation since the first edition was published.


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